He recommends keeping rates close to zero to avoid boom-bust cycles and using collaborating non-private institutions to oversee it. He outlines proposals for how things can change. Eisenstein is a contemporary philosopher, who has penned several tomes - after The Yoga of Eating and The Ascent of Humanity, this is his latest book, addressing economic issues. It enables the dignity of all humanity and unleashes human creativity. Refresh and try again. Sacred Economics: Money, Gift & Society in the Age of Transition By stripping back all of history to come to a general understanding about the generative nature of economics and then rebuilding it in a way that exemplifies the possibilities and nec. Anything that belongs to the commons should be subject to fees or taxes to create a strong economic incentive for conservation. Seeing the body as an expression of soul and not in a dualistic opposition, he continues a tradition going back through Blake, the Hebrew traditio. I absolutely love this piece: while the end result is highly idealistic, the ideas and approach within are nevertheless applicable on a local scale today and should be strived towards. The Man in the sense I am using it entails corporations, government, etc that comprise top-down governance. But the systemic changes in how money should work seem highly abstract. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. It underscores how money is devouring the Commons (which used to be free for everyone) and how our system of usury is perpetuating infinite debt which will result in the complete destruction of the Commons, unless we change. I think his vision of a gift-based, community-rich, environmentally restorative, human-potential driven future is basically what humanity needs. Where Are We in the Story of the Universe? Perhaps the deepest indication of our slavery is the monetization of time.”. Charles Eisenstein is a teacher, speaker, and writer focusing on themes of civilization, consciousness, money, and human cultural evolution. A broadly integrated synthesis of theory, policy, and practice, Sacred Economics explores avant-garde concepts of the New Economics, including negative-interest currencies, local currencies, resource-based economics, gift economies, and the restoration of the commons. It underscores how money is devouring the Commons (which used to be free for everyone) and how our system of usury is perpetuating infinite debt which will result in the complete destruction of the Commons, unless we change. This treatise on alternative economics serves up some very worthy ideas that are compromised by a handful of the author’s less rigorous tendencies and … Elimination of interest rates and the creation of negative interest on reserves to eliminate hoarding by banks, keep money circulating, and end the risk-free advantage of usury (i.e., no more making money, just because one has money, at the expense of others and nature). In fact, I think the passage I read was an excerpt from this book! if the demurrage rates were too high. A very strong effort, one of those books which I feel is almost unfair to review in any sort of detail without allowing the author’s full arguments to speak for themselves. Does money, as the greatest tool that we have created to organize human activity, help to serve this purpose? There are no discussion topics on this book yet. We’d love your help. The social dividend would be the bare amount to cover life’s necessities, as it is more just to pay out the proceeds of economic rent of the commons, pollution taxes and so on to all citizens. If not, how can we rewrite the rules of money to better reflect our objectives? “When everything is subject to money, then the scarcity of money makes everything scarce, including the basis of human life and happiness. “After centuries of technological advances, why do we find ourselves working just as much as ever?” he asks, before observing: “For centuries, futurists have predicted an imminent age of leisure. In ecology, this is the principle of interdependence.” So far I haven't found any others that do a better job of it. The social dividend acknowledges that the gifts of our ancestors and nature and the technological advances that they have made possible are a vast storehouse of wealth and innovation to which all of humanity are shareholders. I've always been fascinated with our shared magical belief that green pieces of paper have worth and even stranger today, that taps from computers add and subtract numbers to bank accounts. How weird that these feelings can be evoked by a tome about economics! Anyone offer any help in finding it? The book is Sacred Economics by Charles Eisenstein and the talk is on Sacred Service by Andrew […]. ", Brilliant!! This book has changed the manner in which I approach my daily life and the interactions that entail. In his overly long, unbearably redundant book, Eisenstein drowns a few valid concepts - namely, the importance of community, a reversal of pervasive commodification, and a restoration of our connection with the goods and services we buy - in a lukewarm broth of lazy, unscientific ideas. What a pleasure it was to discover a kindred spirit, and to consciously work with Charles to "build a field" of awareness around these ideas. Listening to him it was like someone had taken every really important thread I had been following for the last twenty years and woven them together into a coherent narrative. What Indigenous Wisdom Can Teach Us About Economics. This book is one of my top recent reads. Sacred Economics is a cracking read that I cannot recommend highly enough. It looked so big and heavy, and such a "heavy" topic. Book Review: Sacred Economics | Money, Gift and Society in the Age of Transition. The book revolves around the theme of how the current monetary system based on interest and usury, along with the abandonment of the gift economy, led to social alienation, competition and need for an economic system predicated on continuous growth. The move away from the money economy itself isn't new. I highly recommend this one! This book kind of blew my mind. Internalization of social and environmental costs could be achieved by backing currency with a basket of Earth’s resources and its capacity to absorb waste. Charles Eisenstein has some really irritating New-Agey ways of explaining things at times (instead of condemning the atrocities of the past he compares them to a childish phase necessary for our growth into adulthood as a species, which is pretty insane in my opinion) and tends to repeat himself more than necessary but overall this is a pretty good summary of the alternative economic ideas we should all be considering. ... about the monetization of everything. Intellectual property can be returned to the commons by shortening copyrights and patents, thereby acknowledging the cultural matrix from which ideas arise. I have read two of Eisenstein's books, this one and "A Most Beautiful World." Highly recommended. And it gives and amazing positive and possible future ahead for our world and economic system! Charles Eisenstein’s Sacred Economics is a radical book penned with a lot of passion and the best of intentions. Charles Eisenstein is a teacher, speaker, and writer focusing on themes of civilization, consciousness, money, and human cultural evolution. I didn't think I would get through it, but, surprisingly, I did. This is one of the few books I think should be required reading for every college student. Julia Hartsell and Jonathan Hadas Edwards, Renée Rolle-Whatley and Ramona Rolle-Berg, David R. Kopacz, MD and Joseph E. Rael (Beautiful Painted Arrow), Audrey Eger Thompson and Jakob van Wielink, Caveat Magister and Photography, Scott London, Joaquin Carral, Marge Wurgel, Aurora Leon, Alfredo Sfeir-Younis (Dzambling Cho Tab Khen), Wahinkpe Topa (Four Arrows), aka Donald Trent Jacobs, Judy Rodgers, Gayatri Naraine, Rhonda Fabian, Alnoor Ladha, Daniel Pinchbeck, Rhonda Fabian, Judy Wicks, Pat McCabe, Li An Phoa, Eve Miari, By Alnoor Ladha, Martin Kirk, Martin Winiecki, Rhonda Fabian, By Ulysses 'Butch' Slaughter and Tamara S. Hamilton, The Tree Saviors of Chipko Andolan | A Woman-led Movement in India. Then I picked it up and started reading in the middle and got really fascinated by his ideas (then went back and read the first half). Charles Eisenstein’s Sacred Economics is a radical book penned with a lot of passion and the best of intentions. The proposal of living by gifts was something obviously good, but I suppose it's up to each individual to try that approach a step at a time. This book can make the most economically averse (I counted myself in that category) into a fan of fiscal possibility because Eisenstein sees the power of a new global story emerging, and he can tell it well.