Ratio:2:1–3:1 3. ... Equalizing, along with compression, is often the first step engineers take when they start their mix. Compression as with other FX, is very much a listening choice. Again, there are no hard and fast rules or formulas that work in all situations. The great thing about multiband compression is that you can target specific frequency ranges of instruments. The only time you may want to use one is if an unnatural variation exists in levels due to poor playing (although its preferred to to ride the faders to even the levels instead of trying to fix the problem with compression). Don't be afraid to experiment often, a horrendously compressed piece of audio can give a very dramatic effect. Welcome to Loop+! Settings for effect can run the gamut; just dial in some settings and see what you get. Multiband compression is a lot more complicated than that. You don’t need much added gain. Compression as with other FX, is very much a listening choice. First and foremost, decide if you even need compression and go from there. compression is “Dynamic Range Compression”…which still sounds like something we’d need a doctorate to understand, and so, in the doctoral spirit, let’s dissect it: first is the term “dynamic range”. You don’t need much, if any, added gain. Using a soft knee on vocals, piano and melodic instruments can make compression less obvious and more natural. You need a bit of added gain here. By mixing the level of the duplicate track back in with the original, it’s easy to strike a balance between a dynamic and a compressed signal. Often people only check the compression in solo, things can sound quite different once the sound is in place in the mix. In this case, start with these mild settings: Gain: Adjust so that the output level matches the input level. Dynamic Music Compression Settings for Horns, Piano, and Percussion, Popular Home Music Recording Software Programs, The Right Computer Setup for Home Recording. Sample settings would look like this: Adding compression to the snare drum is crucial if you want a tight, punchy sound. Generally, electric guitar sounds are pretty compressed. This can be simply due to the type of compressor being used, but often it’s the difference in tone between the peaks and the troughs of an instrument (if you reduce the peaks relative to the troughs, the tone will change). Compression Chart & Cheat Sheet Compressor: An audio processing device that reduces the dynamic range of a signal or in other words reduces the difference between the softest and loudest part of the signal. They can be your best friend, but be careful as they're a double-edged sw… Because music compressors are used so frequently in home recording, it might be helpful for you to have some basic settings for various instruments to get you started. Hundreds Of Plugins Exclusive Deals Leading Online Shop. Release:About 200 ms 5. If you want to use a little compression to bring the guitar forward and give it some punch, try these settings: 1. Compression can negatively affect the timbre of an instrument. You don’t need much added gain. The kick drum responds well to a compressor when tracking. This is great when you have instruments that have a wide frequency range if you need to only compress certain aspects of that instrument. But on a more rhythmic instrument, such as drums, you should use a hard knee. The cc for the piston is entered as a positive number on a -cc Dish or Flat top piston and a negative number on a dome piston. As with other acoustic instruments, you probably wont need to use compression on a piano unless you’re going for a specific effect or want to even out an erratic performance. Listen to your favorite song and make a list on a piece of paper of all the instruments and different vocal tracks. We often compress keys by 2dB to 3dB with a ratio of 2,5:1. That being said, I come from the camp that subtractive over additive tends to be better for your mix in most cases. We hope you enjoy. These are by no means fixed rules you must adhere to, but rather good starting points. Also, a quick note on the topic of high pass filters: use them. These settings were originally posted here. The slow attack is what gives the guitar a bit … This is your starting point for finding out how to get the most out of your Loopmasters samples. This seems very confusing but it is because even though it is a -cc on the piston, those same cc's are gained in cylinder volume. You don’t need additional compression when you track the guitar unless you use a clean (undistorted) setting on your guitar. Still, if you use a compressor, start with these settings: Gain: Adjust so that the output level matches the input level. People will usually use a higher compression ratio for parallel compression ranging from 4:1 to 10:1. Often people only check the compression in solo, things can sound quite different once the sound is in place in the mix. Even two of the same model will have slightly different characteristics. Gain:Adjust so that the output level matches the input level. Attack: 10–20 ms. Release: About 50 ms It’s rare that a compressor is used on horns. You have a lot of choices with the snare. Attack:25–30 ms 4. In the chart which explains atack and release time, naming of *input and output signal* is inverted either in the text or in the chart. Always check the sound in context of the mix as well. Here are some basic settings by instrument that work well for VCA compressors. Threshold:–1dB 2. The sounds in your mix will always have their own context and characteristics. Always check the sound in context of the mix as well. Here are good starting points: Threshold: –10dB. Not everyone's ethos on EQ is the same, and most people may never see eye to eye on EQ approach. Because percussion instruments have high sound levels and are prone to extreme transients, often you might want to use a little compression just to keep these transients from eating up headroom in the mix. An EQ cheat sheet, also called an instrument frequency chart or an audio frequency chart, is an infographic that displays the supposed frequency responses of every common instrument laid out across the frequency range of human hearing. You're trying to figure out how loud each instrument and … This instrument chart is just a starting point. Now, I'm not saying to live in a strictly subtractive world; I do make boosts from time to time when needed or appropriate, but it's probably a 3:1 or 4:1 ratio of cuts to boosts. Compression The compression on keys often sounds great with an attack time between 25 milliseconds and 60 milliseconds, and a release time between 50 milliseconds and 120 milliseconds. For most hand drums, start with the following settings: Because percussion instruments have high sound levels and are prone to extreme transients, often you might want to use a little compression just to keep these transients from eating up headroom in the mix. This refers to the variance or difference between the loud parts and soft parts in a given sound. Try starting with these figures, & then adjust things until it sounds right. Listen to your favorite song and make a list on a piece of paper of all the instruments and different vocal tracks. Copyright © 2008-2020 Loopmasters. Now, on a scale of 1-10, give each track a volume level rating with 10 being the loudest instrument in the song. Following our generic EQ settings, we thought it would be nice to include a generic compressor settings table. Now, on a scale of 1-10, give each track a volume level rating with 10 being the loudest instrument in the song. So use this chart as a jumping off point, but always use your mix as the ultimate reference for applying EQ. All rights reserved. Using compression to even an erratic piano performance takes a little more finesse. As you can see in the chart below all the instruments have a specific place in the frequency spectrum. Here are good starting points: Gain: Adjust so that the output level matches the input level. 8 Tips For Using Panning Effectively In Your Mix, Writing For Strings - Tips For Creating Great Disco Strings, Audio Compressor Basics - Understanding What Compressors Do. Try starting with these figures, & then adjust things until it sounds right. For the most part, you can get by with settings that allow the initial attack to get through and that tame the boom a little. The following settings are common and versatile: Compression is usually a good idea with hand drums because the drum can produce unpredictable transients. You're trying to figure out how loud each instrument and … The blue color represents the fundamental frequencies of each specific instrument while the reds signify their harmonics.