Fires in London were common, even inevitable, given the capital's largely timber construction. The Second Great Fire of London in December 1940 was one of the most destructive air raids of the Blitz during World War II. The city had been decimated by an outbreak of plague, which began the year before and continued well into spring. When the Great Fire finally was extinguished on September 6, more than four-fifths of London was destroyed. Before the Great Fire of London Despite many previous fires and predictions of more, firefighting techniques were very basic. [3] The Great Fire of London … When her name is Rosa Parks. All editorial and photography on diffordsguide.com is copyright protected, Please confirm you are over 21 years old and enter your email, Reviews, Ratings & Our Rules of Engagement. There are a lot of reasons why the fire was so large, mostly to do with the way houses were built – a lot of them were made from wood, and were very close together. On the plus side, it did help put an end to the bubonic plague, while only six people are known to have died. Striking on 2 September 1666, it raged for nearly five days, during which time its destructive path exposed London’s makeshift medieval vulnerability. All rights reserved. Dave Fowler • History in Numbers • All third party trademarks are hereby acknowledged. It didn't look too serious to begin with - in one of history's more unfortunate statements, the Mayor of London observed that "A woman might piss it out!" The fire raged for three days, destroying 80% of London, including 13,200 houses, 87 churches and St Paul's Cathedral. On the plus side, it did help put an end to the bubonic plague, while only six people are known to have died. London had been a Roman settlement for four centuries and had become pro… It destroyed a large part of the City of London, including most of the civic buildings, old St. Paul’s Cathedral, 87 parish churches, and about 13,000 houses. Today is the day when Scots around the world celebrate their patron saint, St Andrew, who intervened in a memorable battle against the Angles around a, How does a woman become famous for riding a bus? By the 1660s, London was by far the largest city in Britain, estimated at half a million inhabitants. There was no fire department in those days - although citizens did their best with fire breaks - so today's anniversary is a great opportunity to toast firemen everywhere with a splendid Rum Sour, the Fireman's Sour. And then - as every English schoolchild learns - late at night a fire started in a bakery in Pudding Lane. The Second Great Fire of London in December 1940 was one of the most destructive air raids of the Blitz during World War II. On Sunday, September 2, 1666, the fire began accidentally Great Fire of London, (September 2–5, 1666), the worst fire in London’s history. Read on for key facts from the first day of the Great Fire of London. John Evelyn, contrasting London to the Baroque magnificence of Paris in 1659, called it a "wooden, northern, and inartificial congestion of Houses", and expressed alarm about the fire hazards posed by the wood and the congestion. 4 September 1666, 6am. The fire was so big that it was called the Great Fire of London. - but the city was wooden and dry. Read on for the key facts from the third day of the Great Fire of London. Day 2 – Monday 3rd September 1666 “A hell of confusion and torment” Having started with a single fire the previous morning, by Monday the fire was already out of control and destroying around 100 houses every hour, the flames still being fanned by the strong winds that blew from the north east. The Great Fire of London was an inferno of such all-consuming proportions that it left 85 per cent of the capital’s population homeless. Above: Map showing the extent of the fire at the close of Tuesday (arrow points to Pudding Lane, where the fire started). We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. £2,350 – the value of gold, his life savings, that Pepys took with him (having already moved most of their possessions to safety). The fire raged for three days, destroying 80% of London, including 13,200 houses, 87 churches and St Paul's Cathedral. 5:00 a.m. – the approximate time that the King Charles II and the Duke of York rode through the city to give encouragement to people fighting the fire. On 1st December 1955, Parks, an African-American activist, was sitting in. - but the city was wooden and dry. It was a four day blaze, which swept through Britain's capital, destroying large parts of it. BBC Teach > School Radio > History > The Great Fire of London Music 1 - Music 2 - Music 3 - Dance 1 - Dance 2 - Dance 3 - Drama 1 - Drama 2 - History 1 During the programme the children will: And, no, The man who brought us Heart of Darkness, the book that inspired the film Apocalypse Now, Joseph Conrad was born in Poland on this day in 1857, and christened. The fire was successfully held back at St Dunstan-in-the-East, thanks to the efforts of a group of schoolboys. Top 10 facts. In 1982, a Seattle dentist named Barney Clark awoke from surgery he had known he was unlikely to survive, with a brand new heart in his chest. 666 is, of course, the mark of the beast, and on this day in 1666, Londoners were already feeling anxious. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it. The fire lasted four days, and burned down over 13,000 homes. ... 3 September 1666, during the day. Yet for years there had been warnings of London's total destruction by fire… Great Fire of London, (September 2–5, 1666), the worst fire in London’s history. By "inartificial", Evelyn meant unplanned and makeshift, the result of organic growth and unregulated urban sprawl.